The Equine Practice Inc

A Pain In My Finger

This is a tough job. Just look at my finger here. Kinda gross. I know I’m supposed to rasp teeth, but I decided to rasp off part of my fingernail.

After 60,000 horse floats, I still occasionally do this. It never happens to the horse though. But why do I subject myself to this sort of trauma? Cuts, bruises, and sore muscles are all part of working with horses and I wouldn’t want it any other way.

We have a choice. We could automatically drug every horse I work on and immobilize the head using a mouth speculum and head stands but we choose not to. There are two simple reasons for this. The first is because this technique does a better job than the modern dentist technique that has larger equipment and a limited range in the mouth due to obstructions by equipment. The second reason is because we are horsemen and the reason we work with horses is because we want a connection with the horse. It is the juice that drives us all those miles to your barn.

We must be on the right path because we keep getting calls from people that basically say – “You don’t use those power tools, do you?” I got one this morning from Florida and one yesterday from Kentucky. Almost every day someone from somewhere is asking for a better way to float teeth.

If you know of someone who wants to learn The Tucker Technique Of Equine Dentistry™, have them e-mail me.

The online dentistry school keeps heading towards completion. For the video sections, I needed to upgrade my computer. From the picture you can see the black cylinder. That’s it. It’s a mean machine with more computing power than I have ever had in my life. It should make short work of the videos.

The Equine Practice Inc
Colorful!

Tomorrow’s a road trip. I’ll talk to you tomorrow. Doc T

Preserving traditional equine dentistry, one day at a time.

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Comments 1

I look forward to reading your comment! Doc T